Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Free cultural and intellectual events in D. C. for the week beginning Thursday, July 18

Here's an abbreviated list of  some free intellectual and cultural things to do that are easily accessible by bus and/or metro for the week beginning Thursday, July 18.

Particularly note the continuing temporary display on the lower level of  The Holocaust Museum:
IT IS A MUST SEE!

AMERICANS and the Holocaust: WHAT DID AMERICANS KNOW? WHAT MORE COULD HAVE BEEN DONE?

(I spent 3 hours there the other day and only saw one-half of the exhibition.)

In the listing of lectures at Politics and Prose, please note that bus service is available directly in front of the Kennedy/Warren (and other bus stops) directly to the Politics and Prose.

Thursday, 18
Book author:  Tim Alberta – American Carnage – chief political correspondent for "Political" details the internal crisis of the Republican Party that resulted in putting Trump in the White House – P&P – 7 PM – 8 PM

Concert:

Take 5! with Integriti Reeves: A Tribute to Nat "King" Cole

THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2019, 4:30 – 6:30PM EDT: SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM - EASY ACCESS VIA THE RED LINE.

Friday 19

Saturday, 20
Book author: William D.Cohan – Four Friends – classmates from Phillips Academy'whose lives were all cut short include the son of a Holocaust survivor, a Chicago lawyer, and the grandsons of Harry Truman and John F. Kennedy –  P&P – 3:30 PM

Book author: Michael K. Kellogg – The Wisdom of the Renaissance – a review of the intellectual and artistic advances during the Renaissance. Two centuries of intellectual progress – P and P – 6 PM


Sunday, 21
Book author: Bruce Beehler – Birds of Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia – P&P – 
1 PM

Book author: Williams  Sturkey – Hattiesburg – The author charts the parallel and starkly unequal experiences of the towns Black and white residents including Faulkner's great-grandfather – P&P – 3 PM

Film




The Man Who Fell to Earth
July 21 at 4:30
East Building Auditorium National Gallery of Art
A striking contribution to the science-fiction genre as well as a cautionary tale about the protection of natural resources, The Man Who Fell to Earth features David Bowie in his acting debut as an alien sent to our planet to source water for his own. British director Nicolas Roeg’s surreal mise-en-scène and Tony Richmond’s sumptuous cinematography make the most of Bowie’s considerable screen presence. The film’s narrative ellipses serve to emphasize enduring existential qualities of estrangement and despair. (Nicolas Roeg, 1974, 148 minutes)
Monday, 22
Book author: Richard A. Clarke and Robert A. Knake - The Fifth Domain – A look at cyber wars and attempt to shut down infrastructures and manipulate data – P&P – 7 PM

Tuesday,  23

Wednesday, 24



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